Latest CoreTech News

Latest CoreTech News

Meaningful Use and Technologies Create Meaningful Obstacles

As pressures continue to cut costs, hospitals and doctors face tough IT challenges in 2014 with deadlines for Meaningful Use and new technology demands. In addition to the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), they will also have to ramp up to meet Stage 2 and Stage 3 requirements for meaningful use of electronic health records at the same time as they prepare for the crucial Oct. 1 conversion to the more complex ICD-10 coding system. At the same time, the good news is that more health systems are utilizing fully mature health IT environments, big data and mobile devices.

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Evaluating the Importance of Tools in Patient Engagement

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Tuesday, 17 December 2013 19:20

Will patients embrace an active role in their own care? As deadlines approach for “meaningful use” of technology to increase patient engagement, health care providers are challenged to convince at least 5 percent of patients to communicate electronically about their care. Unfortunately, there’s not a one-size-fits-all strategy to do so: it will take a mix of electronic medical records, surveys and self-registration to increase your chances of success.

Patient portals through traditional websites and mobile apps may empower patients no matter where they are – serving as centers of information. But how can you increase interaction? University of Colorado Health is piloting tools to engage patients before and after discharge through wellness, fitness and nutrition tips. A smartphone app allows a person to measure progress in areas such as weight and blood pressure while also allowing physician access so they can delve into the data and better understand the patient’s condition.

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Engaging Patients and their Families in their Healthcare is the Way of the Future

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Tuesday, 17 December 2013 19:17

How can increasing patient engagement improve the quality of care the patient is receiving?

Patient engagement is more than the latest catch phrase; it holds the potential to improve health outcomes, ensure right use of medical services and reduce costs for everyone involved.

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Technology Reduces Inpatient Stays

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Monday, 25 November 2013 15:54

Some simple uses of technology make it easier to send patients home sooner. Shorter inpatient stays and improved quality benefit everyone involved. In just-released data from 14 New Jersey hospitals, eliminating bottlenecks and standardizing processes meant briefer stays of up to 50 percent.

The New Jersey Hospital Association's Partnership for Patients worked with the Institute for Healthcare Optimization to analyze data.  They found inefficiencies including irregular use of operating rooms, admission delays and uneven discharge processes. All impacted how long patients stayed. This study, as well as other pilot projects, provide lessons on how to help both patients and hospitals.

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Filling Prescriptions in One Place

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Monday, 25 November 2013 15:50

The most common patient safety error involves medications. A third of all Americans already take five or more medications and every year failure to take those medications as prescribed causes more than 1.5 million preventable events. In addition to saving lives, improved medication prescription and compliance could reduce the estimated $290 billion these issues cause.

Whether admitted to the hospital or visiting a new specialist, patients often receive new medications or adjustments in their current ones. As a result, there could be dangerous combinations, duplicated therapies or incorrect dosages. Ultimately, the best system would be one that links every system which dispenses medication to create one central medication list for each patient. Until that occurs, one simple step is encouraging patients to fill their prescriptions in one place.

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